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Birth & Babies With Nurse Rita

Author: Nurse Rita Stevens 

Q: I do not want to breastfeed my baby. It looks painful. My mother says I am not thinking about the best interest of my baby. Am I being selfish? Why should I breastfeed? 

Breastfeeding is a personal decision and should be a woman’s choice. Everybody has an opinion but at the end of the day you should do your homework to search out all the evidence-based information. 

Be aware that everything changes when you give birth. Give yourself and the baby some time to adjust to all the mental, physical, and emotional changes that just occurred. 

Breastfeeding initially may seem hard but with time and practice it’s a beautiful experience. Be open to the idea that you might need some one-on-one support from a lactation educator or consultant. They encourage you to practice “self-care” which includes rest, proper diet and hydration. They work on early day breastfeeding techniques, problem-solving and getting to know your baby. 

All women, whether they choose to breastfeed or not, should be supported in their decision without judgment. 

Q:  My son is six months old and both sets of grandparents are asking to have him for hours at a time and I am not ready for that. My husband feels I’m being too clingy. How can I get them to understand that I’m simply not ready? 

Prior to this current pandemic, (Corona/Covid-19), I would have had a different answer to this question. As we are currently coming through this time, I would strongly advise that you strictly follow the guidelines for returning back to social interactions. 

It’s not about what the grandparents want. It’s about your inability to communicate properly in regards to what’s best for your baby at six months. Good communication and honesty can go a long way in problem-solving! My suggestion would be for you to sit down and discuss how you feel without judgment. Then proceed to a plan you can both agree on. 

Keep in mind that mothers can be very protective of their baby’s in the first year of life if not for a lifetime! Your feelings should always be handled with care and respected by all involved. That includes the grandparents who will respect their adult children’s wishes when they witness a united front. 

Q: Is Lamaze necessary? I want to do it but my boyfriend thinks it’s a waste of time. 

Education can never be thought of as a “waste of time”. All childbirth classes are essential for obtaining accurate knowledge. You must understand your body and how it works during labour, delivery and post-par tum recovery. Labour is a physical, hormonal, emotional, psychological and spiritual event. These things all work together in a powerful harmony to bring a new life into the world. Information helps you make informed decisions about what type of birth you would like to achieve. You are then able to put a birth plan together with your coach, physician, labour nurses and doula. 

I encourage you to have a chat with your boyfriend. Let him know your desire to understand what is going to happen to you in this upcoming birth and that you need his support. I’m sure he will support you! 

Q: At what age should I introduce my baby to technology? 

Babies should absolutely NOT be exposed to any electronic devices for three years! 

The latest scientific research proves that TV’s, iPhones, iPads, and computers interrupt the important work of early brain development. Proper neuro-pathway wiring is a constant brain activity from birth until age three.  

Electronic devices were designed to trigger the “addiction centre” of the brain. Don’t believe me? How many times a day do you check your phone? Do you feel anxious without your phone? Do you feel like you’re missing out on something if you aren’t constantly checking? Do you sleep with the phone on the night table? Does a baby or small child have the ability to cope with such a powerful attraction? 

Nurse Rita Stevens is the owner of BirthPlus. To book a consultation, email her at nurserita94@gmail.com. BPM